Do we finally have the ability to have true “international” products?

Did you see the recent article about Google making its real-time translation tool available for the Android phone?  If not, you can read it here.

While this implementation will undoubtedly be fun for a number of cell phone users, imagine the impact if a number of enterprise software companies incorporate this technology into their products.

We have long talked about “localized” software products that are available in a number of single languages.  In other words, users in France interact with the software in their native language — French.   We also talk about “internationalized” software products that display numbers and other elements using the format that is appropriate for each user — which is important when users from different locales are sharing the same application.

However, we have not yet seen applications where free-form text entered by one user in one language can be read and understood by another user in a different language.  Google’s tool offers the promise of this capability.

Granted, any “automatic translation” tool will have problems in accurately conveying the content, context, and subtleties of a language.  And I suspect this problem will be especially difficult when translating between languages that have different origins (for example, English and Japanese).   However, as more applications incorporate this type of technology, more investment (and resulting technology improvements) will follow.

Consider the following situations where this technology would literally “change the rules”:

  • PDM, PLM, ERP Systems — Product descriptions, instructions to suppliers, questions on design intent from part manufacturers, etc.  In today’s global environment where a supply chain may include companies in multiple locales, the ability for each member of your supply chain to communicate in their language could significantly improve your ability to design and produce quality parts.  It also makes it easier for you to find additional suppliers because they no longer have to communicate in your language.
  • Twitter, Blogs, and Other Social Media Tools — You could interact with customers and potential customers in their language.  This would allow you to review a product idea with potential customers in a wide variety of locales and thus avoid problems like giving your new product a name that means “toilet” in another language.  And wouldn’t you like to know whether a product is interesting to a particular locale before you pay to translate the product’s screens, documentation, marketing, and sales materials into that language?  I know I would.
  • CRM and Other Customer Feedback Tools — As with the social media tools, imagine how much your customer service might improve if you could actually exchange information with your current customers in their language.  Today, companies rely on small teams of customer support specialists with multiple language skills.  However, this approach can introduce another layer of “interpretation” between the customer who is describing the problem and the Development engineer who has to fix it — which increases the difficulty (and cost) of providing timely bug fixes.  How much could you improve your service and reduce your costs if reliable and accurate real-time language conversion was available?

There are many other categories of commercial (and even military) applications that could benefit from this technology.  What is your favorite?  Or perhaps this problem is too complicated to be solved by any technology, even one from the guru’s at Google.   What do you think?

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